Testing for Safety Purposes and Pushing Others Around

Objective

Students will demonstrate their understanding of stage combat safety by taking a Combat Safety Rules Test. Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding through participation in class activities, a mini-performance at the end of the class period, and a reflective entry in their learning log.

 

 

Materials Needed

Tumbling or wrestling mats
Related Documents
• Unarmed Stage Combat Safety Test   3.Unarmed Combat Safety Test
• Unarmed Stage Combat Safety Test KEY   3.Unarmed Combat Safety Test KEY
• Terminology Handout   3.Terminology Handout

 

 

Lesson Directions

Anticipatory Set/Hook
When students enter the room, ask them to sit on the floor in a circle with their backpacks. Have the desks arranged along the walls of the room. Each should be at least 2-3 feet from other desks. On the desk, have paper cups of dark chocolate (M & M’s).

Entertain the students’ curiosity and questions while you take roll.
Ask: Do you remember what is happening today? (Safety test)
What should the rules be for taking the test? (No talking, do own work, don’t cheat, etc.)
Do you have any questions? (Answer/clarify for students) Checking for Understanding.
Are you prepared?
Would you like a few minutes to study for the test? (If so, give students 5-10 minutes to review, and discuss the safety rules among themselves.)

Explain: Research show that dark chocolate helps the brain to think. Each of the cups on the desks has a little chocolate in it to help your brain work better during this test.

Directions: They can only take pencils with them.
Make certain they understand that they need to write legibly— Write this on the board and emphasize that if the teacher cannot read it, the student does not get credit.
They must leave their backpacks, books, coats, etc. in a pile in the middle of the room.
After completing these direction, have students move quietly to pick up a test, go to a desk with a pencil/pen and start the test.

 

 

Instruction

Transition: Upon completing the test, have the students give you their tests AND their paper cups.
Students need to remove all jewelry (rings, watches, earrings, necklaces, etc.) and empty their pockets. Put everything in the baggy and zip it up. Then, have the students put the baggy in their backpacks, then to put their backpacks against the wall and start warming up quietly.

When everyone has finished the test, and warmed up: REVIEW: The previous lesson.

 

Step 2—Transition: Ask: What does the handout say about Stage Combat?
STAGE COMBAT IS A ___________ _________ . (TEAM EFFORT)
So it takes at least ______ (two) people to create a stage fight.

 

Step 3—Before students select a partner ask if it is not important for them to partner
with a person of the same sex? (No) You can partner with either sex.
Is it be easier to learn the techniques with a partner approximately the same height and weight? (Perhaps)
Do you have to have a partner who is approximately the same height and weight? (No)

 

Instruction:

Explain that there are only two rules about pairing off:
1) You can never have the same partner again. You must work with a different partner every time.—except when the teacher assigns a partner for the final fight, then you must work with that partner every time.
2) As partners, you must listen to each other’s suggestions, especially when the suggestions come from the partner playing the victim at that time. Give equal weight to what each partner says. Neither one of you should work as the teacher of director unless mutually agreed upon by the performers and your director/teacher.

Have students pair up with whomever they feel they can work well with.

 

Step 4—Group Practice: Organize the performers so that all partner A’s face the same direction and all B’s face the same direction. (Never have two people playing the same part work back to back because it will cause unnecessary traffic problems once they begin moving about the space.)
Arrange the rehearsal space so that every performer can be seen at all times; this will help in coaching the students through each of the techniques.
Each performer should be able to move about freely in all directions for several feet before running into a fellow performer.
Make sure the students understand that this is how they should be every time they practice stage combat.

 

Step 5—Ask: Is it necessary for you to trust your partner? (Yes) Why? (Because if you don’t, you can’t perform combat realistically. You’ll be second guessing your partner. Etc.)
Ask: How can you develop trust in your partner? (By working together. Time. Etc.)
Who trusts your partner ? (students raise hands)
How can you test your trust in your partner? (Trust fall)
Who is willing to take the test?
Have each partnership do the trust fall. (One partner turns his back on his partner. The other partner takes a solid stance so he/she can keep his/her balance and catch the first partner in his/her when the first partner falls back. If the person falling steps back to catch himself, he doesn’t trust his partner.)
Reverse the process so the second partner does the trust fall.

Ask: Other than trust, what else should we do as far as our partner is concerned? (Respect your partner and work at their capacity and training level.)

 

Step 6—Transition: Ask: How do fights get started?
What kind of move do people usually use to start a fight?

Today, we are going to learn some stage combat moves that be used to instigate a choreographed fight as well as mixed into the middle of the fight.

 

Step 7—Making certain everyone can hear the explanation and see the demonstration, teach the students how to do the Poke.

Instruction: This is a very simple move in which the attacker uses his index finger to poke the victim in the chest, back, shoulder, or upper arm. (Emphasize that the Poke is the only move that the victim does not control the movement in stage combat. For all other strikes, the victim always controls the movement.)

Ask for a volunteer victim. Demonstrate the poke.

Checking for Understanding:

 

Step 8—Modeling: Ask for a volunteer to demonstrate what they have learned for the class. Remind the student to always be in control.
As the student performs the skill, spot him/her if needed.

Ask: Was this skill done correctly?
What was good about it?
How could it be improved?
(Students give feedback first, then add corrective information)

Have the volunteer repeat the skill. Give him/her appropriate feedback. Let others who want to demonstrate their ability to perform the move to do so. Give them appropriate feedback.

 

Step 9— Guided Practice: Have Partner A practice the move as the attacker. Then switch, and have Partner B practice the move as the attacker.

Give students feedback as they practice so they can improve their performance.
Only a few minutes are needed to practice because these moves are so simple.

Checking for Understanding: Ask the students how they feel about doing the move. What is difficult? Answer and clarify as much as possible. If necessary, go through the process again to help students improve.

 

Step 10—Repeat steps 7, 8, and 9 for the Push.
Always use Eye Contact
The Sign/Cue: Open hands come up to the Attacker’s chest.
Instruction: The Attacker walks up to the victim, and places his/her hands on the shoulders of the victim. The Victim leans forward which pushes the Attackers elbows into a bent position. The Victim then pushes his/her body back to create the illusion of being forcibly pushed. This can vary from slight to extreme, depending upon the degree of violence the push needs to appear to be.

Emphasize that the movement and/or reaction of the Push is controlled by that the victim—the victim always controls the movement.
Ask: When practicing stage combat, in what speed should we rehearse? (Always rehearse in slow motion. Set the ideal slow motion tempo and have students practice it.)
Explain: It is also a good idea to demonstrate what it means for everyone to work at the same tempo. Why?

Explain that the push can be used as the instigation of a fight and/or in the middle of a fight.

Checking for Understanding: Ask the students how they feel about doing the move. What is difficulty, Answer and clarify as much as possible. If necessary, go through the process again to help students improve.

 

Step 11— Repeat steps 7, 8, and 9 for the Clothes/Lapel Grab.
Always use Eye Contact
The Sign/Cue: The Attacker makes a fist, and bring them up to his/her chest.
Instruction: The Attacker steps, grabbing the lapels, color or front of clothing at the chest by using your thumb and fist (closed fingers). The fabric of the clothing is held in place by the thumb, against the fist so the audience cannot see that the attacker is not holding on to the clothing with his/her fingers. The Victim moves back and forth to create the illusion of being violently shaken. This can vary from slight to extreme, depending upon the degree of violence needed.
Ask: Who controls the movement and/or reaction? (the victim—the victim always controls the movement)

Explain that the Clothes/Lapel Grab can be used as the instigation of a fight and/or in the middle of a fight.

Checking for Understanding: Ask the students how they feel about doing the move. What is difficulty, Answer and clarify as much as possible. If necessary, go through the process again to help students improve.

*******************DETAIL PROCESS FOR WRIST GRAB***********************

 

Step 12— Repeat steps 7, 8, and 9 for the Upward Thrust.
Always use Eye Contact
The Sign/Cue: Letting go of the attacker, making a fist, and dropping the elbows

Instruction: The Victim of a strike move closes his/her hands into a fist, puts the fists together. Bringing the fists to center torso (stomach area), the Victim pushes the fists upward between the Attackers forearms, and thrusts them outward, breaking the Attacker’s hold.

NOTE: This defensive move can be use with the Clothes/Lapel Grab and other strikes which will be learned at a later date.

 

Step 13—Transition: Inform them that each partnership will perform the newly learned moves in combination for the class. Give the students a few minutes create a mini-performance utilizing anything been taught (instigation(s), defensive move(s), falls). Be sure to leave enough time for performances and critiques.
Emphasize that there is to be no improvisational moves.

Ask for a volunteer to demonstrate what they have learned for the class. Remind the student to always be in control.
As the student performs the skill, spot him/her if possible.

Ask: Was this skill done correctly?
What was good about it?
How could it be improved?
Did
(Students give feedback first, then add corrective information)

Students may volunteer when they want to perform but all must perform.

 

 

CLOSURE:

Pass out the Terminology Handout so students can study it and be familiar with it. Tell the students they need to practice at home (on a carpet or on the grass). Suggest that they teach their parents what they are learning in class. Remind them that they are to follow the Safety Rules even when they practice at home. Also, remind the students to reflect on what they learned today, then write in their learning log.

 

 

Assessment

Participation, Mini-Performance, and Learning Log Entry

 

 

Author’s Notes

They will learn and understand basic skills that can instigate a choreographed fight in a play and/or film—namely: the poke, the push, clothes grab, and the upward thrust which is a defensive move.
If the test takes too long, cut the stage combat instruction and teach it in the next scheduled class.

Divide the performers into two groups and alternate the practice session if there are too many performers for the size of the room. Each performer should be able to move about freely in all directions for several feet before running into a fellow performer.